What do your cravings mean?

Bad eating habits

Listen to what you are craving and put them into context. Your body may be lacking something essential and the craving is its way of asking for help…

Chocolate:

You’re having a bad day, you’re pregnant or you’re hormonal – We know chocolate in excess is bad for us, so people tend to crave it when it can be justified.

You may have heard rumours that chocolate is great for menstrual cramps or improving your mood, and so you believe it is what you need when going through a tough time.

You’re on a diet – If your diet is too restrictive you will start to crave the things that are tasty, sweet and high in calories. If you are restricting, your body will think of the calorie-dense chocolate you used to enjoy.

Try not to be too tough on yourself, a bite of chocolate here and there is better than restricting yourself and it resulting in a bigger binge later on.

Sweets:

You’re having too many carbohydrates – Sugar cravings are often related to what you ate earlier that day. Simple carbs like white rice, white bread and pasta can spike your blood sugar quickly, leaving you in a slump a short time after – this inevitable slump will leave you looking for another sugar fix.

You are stressed – Sugar and sweets can switch on your brain-reward centre. In tense, stressful situations you may subconsciously crave sugary treats like doughnuts, biscuits or cake for relief.

Salty snacks:

You are dehydrated – Thirst is often mistaken for hunger. If you are craving salty crisps or snacks, it could be that your body needs more water. Try to have a bottle of water with you at all times so you don’t forget to stay hydrated.

You are stressed – Salty snacks are often crunchy. It is simple, but the satisfying crunch when you bite down is a great stress reliever.

Meat:

You are lacking protein – If you are vegetarian or workout a lot, you will need more protein than the regular person. When you are at the gym and at least half of your routine involves resistance training, it is advised you eat one gram of protein for every pound you weigh.

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Ellen Hoggard

Written by Ellen Hoggard

Ellen is the Content Manager for Memiah and writer for Nutritionist Resource and Happiful magazine.
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