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The alternative 'healthy' New Years resolution

Rather than signing up to restrictive dietary regimes in 2017 why not try reconsidering the basic principles underlying the way you eat? Adopting mindfulness as a guide to consumption.

Many of us classically yo-yo from one on trend ‘dietary regime’ to the next, not considering our requirements as individuals, or the potential deficiencies this leaves us vulnerable to. My fundamental recommendations as a nutritional therapist focus on eating whole minimally processed foods (fish, lean meats, eggs, beans, pulses, whole grains, vegetables, fruits, nuts, seeds) and plenty of water daily. 

Adopting mindful eating strategies such as the Japanese mantra of Hara Hachi Bu (eating until you are 80% full) alongside a whole-food diet can support in long-term weight regulation with added health benefits. This way of eating was traditionally coined by the Okinawan people, regarded as one of the healthiest, longest living populations on the planet.

By eating slowly and mindfully to the point where you feel 80% full - a good guide being, eating until you are no longer hungry. You allow the stretch receptors of the stomach to catch up with the food consumed. 

As there is a natural 20-minute delay in food consumed and the stomach stretch receptors communicating satiety to the brain, we all too often eat more than required. It takes only 15-20 meals for the stretch receptors to reset the muscle memory of the stomach. As such over only five to six days you're likely to note natural and supportive reductions in food consumed when following the 80% guide. 

The only trick is to listen to your body whilst choosing the most natural and minimally processed foods. 

Nutritionist Resource is not responsible for the articles published by members. The views expressed are those of the member who wrote the article.

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