Keeping fit after 50

Today, women in their fifties and over are more active than ever; hiking, running, cycling, swimming, there’s nothing holding back these baby boomers, but as we age our bodies need a little extra help to cope with the everyday stresses and strains we place on our ourselves.

A good diet can help to prevent and restore any wear and tear we put our bodies through and here are some tips to help you keep fighting fit at 50:

Prevention – Adopting a varied and healthy diet had undeniable benefits for long-term physical health, but adapting your diet as you get older can offer further protection against some common problems that can occur with ageing. Foods rich in calcium, vitamins D, B6 and B12 can help to prevent or delay the onset of decline in bone density, so adding dairy products, eggs and oily fish to your diet, as well as regular exercise, can help to stave off weakness in bones.

Energy levels - It is important to keep an eye on energy intake, as generally fewer calories are required as we age. However, it is important to consider your level of activity and compensate for energy used accordingly. A low-fat diet with a good balance of carbohydrates and protein should offer the right level of Kcal without leading to unnecessary weight loss or gain.

Maintenance – With ageing comes the inevitable loss of muscle mass and ultimately strength, but there are ways that active mature adults can help to maintain muscle mass and delay the decline in muscle function. Adopting a nutritious diet with a good balance of protein intake can help to limit muscle atrophy and actually keep the muscle density required to maintain strength when exercising.

Recovery – After exercise, older bodies can be more prone to post-workout muscle damage when compared to younger counterparts, and it is, therefore, more essential that a recovery snack or drink based on carbohydrates and protein is taken within the 45 minutes after strenuous activity, to allow your muscles to recover and repair properly.

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