What do the experts say? Our response to Katie Price launching a nutrition range

Two friends sitting down having lunch together.

Earlier this week, it was announced that Katie Price was launching a new range of nutrition products and supplements. And it didn’t take long for people to raise their concerns. Among the complaints were qualified nutritionists and dietitians, who took to Twitter to share their views.

Harley Street nutritionist, Rhiannon Lambert tweeted, “No qualified health professional will ever promote meal replacements over a balanced diet for weight loss. Never.”

We also took to Twitter to share our views, “Really disappointing. There are no quick-fixes to finding health and happiness and supplements / meal replacements are not the answer. Please seek professional help instead of wasting money on potentially harmful products.”

In response, Nutritionist Resource member Susan Hart, said, “I couldn’t agree more. People need to spend their hard earned money on fresh fruit and veg, and simple protein.”

The range of products includes powders for breakfast shakes and meal replacement drinks, and recovery and hydration ‘energy boosters’. The website claims that the meal replacement shakes contain an ingredient that helps reduce “compulsive snacking, sugar cravings, hunger pangs between meals and promote weight-loss and a positive mood.”

Katie Price isn’t the first celebrity to launch a diet product, nor will she be the last, but the overwhelming concern is that meal replacement shakes are not the safest or healthiest way to lose weight. In the constantly growing world of nutrition, it’s easy to get confused and overwhelmed, and so, people look for a simple way out.

Celebrities and those in the public eye are able to influence the general public. If they are seen endorsing certain products, many people take that as the answer. But the fact is, these celebrities aren’t professionals in nutrition and really, the best way to eat is one that makes you happy and healthy – a balanced diet.

London-based nutritionist, Suné Markowitz-Shulman says,

“I believe that a celebrity like Katie Price endorsing inferior supplements, which is mainly targeted to bodybuilders sends the wrong message to an easily-influenced audience about nutrition, health and body image.

Good nutrition is much more than weight-loss. It’s not a quick fix and delves so much deeper than a superficial selfie-obsessed image. It’s about adopting a healthy lifestyle through behaviour change and searching for the root causes of a health problem. If promoting nutrition supplements is a calling, then walking the walk and talking the talk should also be a clear value.”

Protein powders can be helpful for some, but for most people, they’re an unnecessary expense. If you’re looking to learn more about protein powders and how helpful they really are, seek professional help.

Nutrition professionals can assess your diet and lifestyle, and consider your goals to help you devise a safe, healthy plan. It will take time, but living a healthy lifestyle is exactly that, a lifestyle.

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Ellen Hoggard

Written by Ellen Hoggard

Ellen is the Content Manager for Memiah and writer for Nutritionist Resource and Happiful magazine.
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