What happens when you stop eating sugar?

nutrition basics: PCOS

A recent study said that the average person consumes an extra 300 calories a day as a result of added sugar in foods.

What’s more shocking is it’ss thought that 20 per cent of Americans are consuming over 700 added sugar calories every day.

The size of your sugar habit will affect how your body reacts to going cold turkey. It is believed that people eating a high amount of sugar will end up showing withdrawal symptoms, such as anxiety, depression and restlessness. So, what could happen to the average person when giving up sugar?

You’ll be able to throw out the spot cream

That mid-life acne will begin to fade. A known acne trigger is systematic inflammation and sugar is an inflammatory. Research found that non-fizzy drink drinkers consumed one can a day for three weeks, their levels of inflammation increased by 87 per cent.

You’ll sleep when you are supposed to

The midday slump is a result of the energy crashes you experienced after the high sugar boost. Added sugar also triggers the cortisol hormone, this when released can interfere with you sleeping patterns.

Giving up added sugar will not only help you sleep, but you’ll feel much more energetic and productive during the day.

You will be genuinely smiling

Ditching the sweet stuff can understandably make you a little grouchy as they are the foods we turn to for comfort and energy. But once the sugar fix is pushed aside, you will feel much better.

A Columbia University study saw women eating a high sugar diet were more likely to suffer anxiety and experience mood swings and irritability.

You will loss that extra weight

You may replace the sugar-calories with other foods (try swapping the sugar filled chocolate bar for a handful of roasted almonds) but you will be eating less. It is thought that reducing your sugar intake by 200 calories a day will help you lose up to a stone in five to six months!

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Ellen Hoggard

Written by Ellen Hoggard

Ellen is the Content Manager for Memiah and writer for Nutritionist Resource and Happiful magazine.

Written by Ellen Hoggard

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