Home-cooked food from birth increases the likelihood of children eating more fruit and vegetables later in life

Home-cooked food from birth increases the likelihood of children eating more fruit and vegetables later in lifeA study conducted by experts from De Montfort University in Leicester, and Bristol and Birmingham universities has revealed that infants who are fed home-cooked meals from birth are more likely to eat fruit and vegetables when they are older than those fed meals from jars and packets.

The study involved analysing data from 7,866 mothers of children who were born in both 1991 and 1992.

Interestingly, the results of the analysis showed that children who were weaned on home-cooked meals, fruit and vegetables from the age of six months were far more likely to eat larger amounts of fruit and vegetables when they reached the age of seven.

The researchers also found that feeding babies with shop-bought ready-prepared meals had no effect, which the experts have attributed to the fact they can have a uniform taste and texture.

The study, which has been published in the journal of Public Health Nutrition highlighted the importance of exposing children to fruit and vegetables during the early weaning period.

Dr Helen Coulthard, from De Montfort University has said that mothers should really be trying to give their infants home-cooked fruit and vegetables every day.

‘The range and type of foods that young children eat is becoming an increasing cause for concern.

‘In particular, children do not seem to be eating the amounts of fruit and vegetables recommended for health.

‘These variations in the taste and texture of fruit and vegetables should expose an infant’s palate to a wider range of experience, increasing the likelihood they will accept a wider range of foods.’ She said.

View the original Daily Mail article.

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Emma Hilton

Written by Emma Hilton

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